The UK’s geology won’t support UK fracking, claims expert

The UK’s geology won’t support UK fracking, claims expert

We’re 55 million years too late for hydraulic fracturing to work in the UK The UK’s geology is unlikely to be suitable for hydraulic fracturing, research by a Scottish university has discovered. Professor John Underhill, Chief Scientist at Heriot-Watt University, revealed that while opponents of fracking continue to focus on the environmental impact of this method of oil and gas extraction, the geology of the UK doesn’t support it. Professor Underhill explains: “Both sides of…

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How Does Modern Fossil Fuel Extraction Affect Our Planet?

How Does Modern Fossil Fuel Extraction Affect Our Planet?

By James Murphy, Extreme Low Energy Fossil fuels have been an essential source of energy for the Western world since their inauguration during the industrial revolution. Extraction of these fuels has previously involved a significant workforce of labourers engaging in mining and smelting, but through advances in technology extraction it has become easier and increasingly time-efficient for economically-developed nations. Methods such as fracking, drilling (on/offshore), and oil sand extraction have become conventional methods of contemporary…

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Paving the Way to Safer, More Cost-efficient Nuclear Reactors

Paving the Way to Safer, More Cost-efficient Nuclear Reactors

In 2014, The Independent newspaper reported on an impending “nuclear crisis” in the U.K. Unlike many other fears commonly associated with that expression, this was a crisis of age and the possible extinction for the country’s aging nuclear fleet. At the time, all but one of Britain’s reactors was predicted to close in 15 years due to “concerns over their economic viability or safety” and fears circled the possibility of an energy black hole as…

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The Potential Role of AD in Tackling Climate Change

The Potential Role of AD in Tackling Climate Change

By Matt Hale, International Sales Manager, HRS Heat Exchangers With a few notable exceptions, such as new US president Donald Trump and our own Nigel Lawson, the scientific consensus on climate change is well established. As far back as 2004, 75% of US scientific papers accepted the premise of human modification of the climate. Today, as the evidence and scientific literature has grown this figure has risen to 97% or more. The most recent provisional…

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“There’s Only One Thing Wrong with the Capacity Market – and it isn’t the Price”

“There’s Only One Thing Wrong with the Capacity Market – and it isn’t the Price”

Comment from Dr Alastair Martin, founder and chief strategy officer at Flexitricty on the Early Auction for delivery year 2017/2018 result: In truth, there are many things wrong with the Capacity Market (CM) – the UK Government’s flagship policy for the security of national electricity supplies. Among these is not whether or not the CM will work. It will – the lights will stay on. Probably. Nor is it the somewhat disappointing price in the…

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Old Lags or New

Old Lags or New

I often see pictures of installations posted onto sites like Linkedin by their proud creators. The trouble is given my experience I can often see something wrong from the picture; it might be that the gas meter is fitted too near bends and would therefore be inaccurate, it could be that the boiler would be impossible to service or maybe a simple filter change would require significant dismantling and hours of downtime. But most often…

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Public Sector Scotland Hemorrhaging £Millions Due to Lost Savings & Overcharging on Water Bills

Public Sector Scotland Hemorrhaging £Millions Due to Lost Savings & Overcharging on Water Bills

Since the water industry in Scotland opened its doors to competition many years ago Public Sector Scotland  have been literally hemorrhaging £millions on incorrect charges and losing out on potential savings and reductions on water bills due to poor administration of water supply contracts, lack of water consultancy expertise and zero control. Even now a massive Public Sector Scotland water contract went out to tender to the retail water suppliers worth a reputed £350 million…

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What’s in a name?

What’s in a name?

I’ve been called a lot of things in my life so far – and some of them have been polite. On the sportsfield as a rugby player I was a forward -also known as a “grunt”, a donkey or a piano-shifter. (we also got called the “real men” or the “grafters” but mainly by other forwards!), In comparison the backs, whose silky smooth running skills, got them named the “girls”, the “fairies” and the piano-players….

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Is going off-grid really better for the environment?

Is going off-grid really better for the environment?

This glimpse of the future was crafted by: Victor Young If rising global temperatures worry you, you’re not alone. Frustrated that fossil fuels still account for around 80% of the world’s energy consumption, thousands of homes have invested in combined solar-battery storage systems. And that figure is expected to grow to 1 million in Australia alone by 2020. But is going off-grid really the most sustainable choice a consumer can make? As renewables become affordable,…

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Brexit and smart buildings: looking beyond energy efficiency

Brexit and smart buildings: looking beyond energy efficiency

UK environmental policy has come a long way in the last forty years. Once colloquially known as the ‘Dirty Man of Europe’, Britain’s policy makers were renowned for their purely reactive rather than forward-thinking approach to environmental protection, only drafting policies to combat existing and serious problems. It’s possible that attitudes would have changed independently as environmentalism became a more mainstream concern, but it was the UK’s membership of the EU in 1973 (then the…

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